Tertiary effects: Starburst

Another tertiary effect of aperture is in the creation of starbursts.  Some lenses are more susceptible than others to this effect, but the general idea is that one can get a pleasing (or not) starburst at smaller apertures.  Like this: Some photographers use this tertiary effect.  There are filters available that create starbursts at any …

Tertiary effects: Diffraction

Another tertiary effect that photographers are aware of is something called diffraction.  This occurs when you have a very small aperture—the light is actually diffracted by the iris in a way that can be seen in the photograph.  Generally, this effect is not desirable since it affects all the light in the image—nothing is perfectly …

Secondary effects: Bokeh (暈け)

Photographers have taken a word from Japanese, bokeh (暈け), pronounced “BOW-kah”), to describe the quality of the out-of-focus regions in a photograph.  Bokeh is roughly translated as “blur.” Photographers judge the quality of the bokeh in photographs.  Here is a comparison of three different lenses’ bokeh. Most people consider the left image to have the …

Secondary effects: Aperture

Once again, aperture is the hardest leg of the exposure triangle to understand.  Long story short: Large apertures tend to put the background out of focus; Small apertures tend to have more of the scene in focus. The flower on the left was shot with a large aperture, f/4.  The one on the right was …